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Swarm Removal


For honeybee swarm removal, or help and advice on any bee related matters, see the contact information at the bottom of this page


PLEASE NOTE: WE ARE UNABLE TO REMOVE ESTABLISHED COLONIES IN BUILDINGS, STRUCTURES, AT HEIGHTS AND INACCESSIBLE LOCATIONS THAT POSE A SAFETY RISK TO OUR MEMBERS.


Most beekeepers will not remove wasps, however Colin Williams (Wells and Shepton ) can assist in this matter.


Most beekeepers will do their best to help out when someone is troubled by a swarm of honeybees. A swarm is very often attracted to the vicinity of other bees, so quite often they arrive in a beekeeper’s garden, but bees are notorious for not reading the books, so sometimes the swarm arrives in a garden where they are not so welcome. Swarming is the honeybee’s natural means of reproduction. One colony will split into two, three, or sometimes more. Each swarm that emerges, be it from a beekeeper’s hive, or from a hollow tree in the wild, will usually form a cluster in a tree or a shrub. This is a transitional stage, where the bees can regroup prior to moving off to a new home. This transitional stage can take anything from a few minutes, to several hours. There is a belief amongst beekeepers, that the time of a swarm’s departure can be pinpointed accurately to ten minutes before the beekeeper arrives to take them.

There is a limit however, to the beekeeper’s capabilities. If the swarm is hanging in a cluster in the garden, then a beekeeper can remove them without a great deal of difficulty, but if they have entered a building, it is then usually beyond the scope of most beekeepers. Specialist equipment is often required, such as ladders and/or scaffolding, and then there is the risk of damage to property, and the associated insurance implications. This then becomes a task for the local Environmental Health officer,

It is necessary to establish what sort of insects we are dealing with. A beekeeper is usually happy to help with a swarm of honeybees, but does not provide a free service to deal with wasps, bumble bees, or solitary bees.

Click on the picture to identify whether you are dealing with Honeybees, bumblebees or wasps.

Swarm Removal Contacts

 


For swarm removal please see the British Beekeepers Association website here


BBKA swarm removal contacts

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